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Heddau - 2 months ago
Warm light

This might be a stupid question, and some of you have maybe answered this before, but I couldn't find any forum with this discussion. How do I create a more warm and "orange" lighting in my designs? - Anyone who got any tips? I've tried to locate the sun in a low position and in south, but that doesn't create the exact warm kind of light that I want for some of my designs. You've maybe seen the "Houseboat" design made by Chap_dp (he won the "boathouse" challenge) - this is what i want. 

Heddau 2 months ago
12 replies
Theadora - 2 months ago

@Heddau

People use a lot of lanterns, often hidden between and behind furniture, "gold hurricane lamp" is one of them. When you see a design with lighting you like, Remix the room to find out what was used.


In addition to using lanterns, some designers create Photorealistic renders which adds to the ambiance. 

Theadora 2 months ago
Theadora - 2 months ago

P.S. Chad_dp is an incredibly talented designer who has put in a lot of work to get these results. Lighting was important but only part of the "package". The light slider in this particular design is at maximum but you can't expect to get the same results in your own designs by doing the same thing.


It's all trial and error, the more you experiment, the better you'll be able to manipulate the light. :)

Theadora 2 months ago
Heddau - 2 months ago

@Theadora 

Thankyou so much for the answers! I will try to put some lanterns in my design and see if that works : ) 

Heddau 2 months ago
hauser - 2 months ago

Your example ist rendered "photorealistic". The algorithm for normal Rendering  whithout paying is overlighted, you have to turn the lights down on the left. If you download the image, you can use a filter-software to get warm lights ( even in windows, you can find a sunlight filter ). And threre are some redlighted lanterns. 



hauser 2 months ago
Heddau - 2 months ago

@hauser Thanks!

Yeah, I've tried using "photorealistic render" a few times on different designs of mine, but I have never got that really warm look that Chap_dp manage to create in his design. I don't know if there is more to it than just lanterns and/or photorealistic render, but I've tried both things, but it still won't be that kind of warm light. And I'm also surprised that he managed to make it look this warm considering the fact that there is so many cold colors in his design - such as the scenery and the light oak-material. I have only managed to make a design look a little bit warm by using really dark brown oak-material all over and hundreds of lanterns - as well as a low positioned sun.  

Heddau 2 months ago
Heddau - 2 months ago

And yes, I've also tried to turn down the lights, move the sun around, and choose different types of lights that gives a more warm feeling. 

Heddau 2 months ago
hauser - 2 months ago

In the example, it is the chosen wood surface with the low sun position, i think. Every "room" is different. If you make your room public, we can try to find the right settings. 


hauser 2 months ago
hauser - 2 months ago

If you are talking about evening in asia ? There is not enough light for this room hight. 

hauser 2 months ago
starsector - 2 months ago

Interesting that you mention the light oak as a 'cool' color.  I think in this case, the yellow undertone of the light oak contributes to the warm 'yellow' look of the light, which is then reflecting off of other objects.  Plus it's not just the light, but the shadows that give it warmth in contrast and give it depth (and not flat).  Also note that some of the best sunlight renders have their sun at an angle to the wall/window (and possibly the camera?) so that it has more to bounce off of.


starsector 2 months ago
Theadora - 2 months ago

You are using 26 lights. For Photorealistic render the amount of lights you can use is unlimited - for regular/HD renders the limit is about 15, any more won't work.

Theadora 2 months ago
starsector - 2 months ago

The biggest difference between regular renders (including HD and 4K) versus Photorealistic, is that the others have a 'wash' of light through the room regardless of your sun settings.  Photorealistic does not do that.  Controlling the light is very different for that reason, plus how lightbulbs works, etc.  



starsector 2 months ago
starsector - 2 months ago

I noticed a couple of other things that might help.  You often put large openings behind the camera for sunlight, rather than have it coming through your windows.  Sometimes that's what we need/want to do (more often with Photorealistic since they are so dark), but generally speaking, if you want interesting light effects, you need to concentrate the light through the windows.


I also noticed that your camera is often set for wide angle.  And even when it's set for Normal, your camera is quite far from your feature (which means it's also quite far from light sources/windows).


So you're getting a more diffused, flat affect with your lighting rather then sharper, interesting contrasts I think you're wanting. hth :)

starsector 2 months ago